*STRANGE CRAVINGS*
Recipe: Mushroom Soup

May 13, 2013

Most people crave things that are sugary or greasy or otherwise unhealthy. Chocolate cake, for example. Or French fries—did you know French fries are the First Lady’s guilty pleasure? I knew I liked her for reasons beyond her politics and dedication to tackling childhood obesity. Most people, including health conscious ones, crave junk food, or at least that’s what they are vocal about craving. I don’t generally crave junk food. Aside from French fries, which I want to eat about 90% of the time, my food cravings are a little on the unorthodox side.

For example, the other day I was driving home from work, sitting in traffic on what must be the worst freeway in LA and thinking about how incompetent my health insurance company is, when all of a sudden I felt this overpowering urge for a glass of grapefruit juice. The odd part is that I don’t ever drink grapefruit juice. In fact, I can’t remember the last time I smelled grapefruit. Now you could argue this was my body telling me I need vitamin C, but if that were the case wouldn’t I crave orange juice, which I used to drink every morning?

Some of my more frequent cravings include tomatoes, pasta with lentils and Swiss chard, dumplings, peach ice cream, and Trader Joe’s olive hummus. None of these foods are that high in sugar or dense in calories (ice cream aside, obviously), and they’re not engineered by the food industry to induce cravings. So why on earth do I wake up in the morning and immediately think about, for instance, roast chicken with tahini sauce? It’s like my body is in a perpetual state of hysterical pregnancy. Continue reading

*RETHINKING COMFORT FOOD*
Recipe: Soft Tofu Stew (Soondubu Jjigae)

October 15, 2012

Fall is the season of comfort food. Even in southern California, where the leaves remain green and the temperature doesn’t drop below 65 degrees, pumpkin lattes and hearty stews abound. Most Americans, me included, associate comfort food with dishes like macaroni and cheese, chicken pot pie, beef stew, ice cream, apple pie, or pretty much anything loaded with fat and processed carbohydrates.

Conversely, most Americans associate unappetizing health food with things like tofu, salad, and any vegetable but potatoes (unless it’s a vegetable smothered in cream and/or cheese, in which case it crosses over into the realm of comfort food). But there’s definitely no American-style dish involving tofu that’s considered comforting. The very suggestion is enough to give children nightmares.

I always thought the American notion of comfort food was the universally accepted definition. Then I moved to Egypt and realized that comfort food in the Middle East generally involves rice, which was not on my comfort food radar at that point in time. Growing up, my family would eat rice for one of two reasons: either it was an accompaniment to some kind of “ethnic” meal, like Indian or Mexican food, or it was the only starch we had in the house. Potatoes, pasta, polenta and bread were always preferable to rice. So I associated rice with either foods outside of my comfort zone or as the undesirable substitute for much-loved potato dishes.
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*AROUND THE WORLD IN SOUP*
Recipe: Curried Lentil Soup

March 3, 2012

Soup is one of those things that everyone likes well enough, but no one is all that passionate about. Correct me if I’m wrong, but most people don’t sit down for dinner at a nice restaurant and look for the soup section on the menu. The only time I eat soup out is when it’s a pre-appetizer dish, like miso soup at a Japanese restaurant. Or if I’m on Cape Cod and there’s clam chowder on the menu. Or Portuguese kale soup. Okay, maybe I do like soup well enough to order it, but I still generally associate it with boring one-pot meals and the flu.

Soup is also one of those things, like bread, that every country seems to have a national version of. Think of gazpacho in Spain, avgolemono in Greece, pozole in Mexico, pho in Vietnam, borsht in Russia, tom yum in Thailand—these soups are virtually synonymous with their country’s cuisine. In the U.S. we have regional soups: gumbo in Creole country, clam chowder in the Northeast, wild rice soup in the Midwest. And then there’s the ubiquitous Campbell’s tomato soup, immortalized by Andy Warhol.

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